KJ Jan. 15-21

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January 15, Sunday

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You Shall Surely Die — Ahab, the wicked king of the northern kingdom of Israel, died and his son, Ahaziah, became king in his place.  It seems un-kingly for him to have been climbing on the lattice outside the window of his upper-story room, but he fell and was seriously injured.  Rather than inquiring of Yahweh regarding his survival prospects, he sent messengers about 50 miles (80 km) to the Philistine city of Ekron to inquire of their god, Baal-zebub (“lord of the flies”).  This is when “the angel of Yahweh” stepped in again (v. 3) and told Elijah to intercept the king’s messengers with this message for the king: “you shall surely die” (v. 4).  This was a message of judgment because apparently King Ahaziah thought that “there is no God in Israel” (v. 3).  The king was not satisfied with Elijah’s relayed message, so he sent three groups of 50 soldiers to bring the prophet to see him face to face.  The message did not change, however, and “the angel of Yahweh” told Elijah to give the king the same message, that he “shall surely die” (v. 16).  The message remains the same today for us: all of us will die unless “the angel of Yahweh” returns to rapture His Church before then.  Hebrews tells us that “it is appointed for men to die once, and after this comes judgment” (Heb. 9:27).  We need to be prepared to meet our God.

I Wanna Be Ready – YouTube

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January 16, Monday

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Swift Judgment — I love this story of King Hezekiah, who was trapped in Jerusalem by the surrounding Assyrian army.  He took a threatening letter from the enemy king, laid it before the Lord and prayed, “O Yahweh our God, I pray, save us from his hand” (2 Kings 19:19).  This was a prayer of desperation, being completely helpless, and knowing that God was the only hope.  Have you been in a place like that?  It is actually a good place to be, because it is then that God can clearly demonstrate His love and power.  God mocked the pride of the empire-ruling Sennacherib and then sent swift, overnight judgment on his army through “the angel of Yahweh” (v. 35), apparently snuffing out the lives of 185,000 soldiers while they slept.  Although Jesus did not come to earth to judge during His physical life (John 12:47), He declared that “the Father … has given all judgment to the Son” (John 5:22).  He executed judgment on Sennacherib’s army, and He will execute it also on Judgment Day.

Day of Judgment, Day of Wonders! – YouTube

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January 17, Tuesday

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You Are My Son — This psalm seems to simultaneously refer to King David, his royal descendants, and his ultimate descendant, the Messiah, Jesus.  The Hebrew word for “Anointed” (v. 3) is mashíah (Messiah), and its equivalent in Greek is christós (Christ; see John 1:41).  The LSB capitalizes “Anointed” to emphasize its connection with the future incarnate Jesus, while in other places, the lowercase “anointed” is used for God-anointed human kings of His people.  God’s statement in verse 7 that, “You are My Son, Today I have begotten You,” is quoted three times in the NT, always being applied to Jesus Christ (Acts 13:33; Heb. 1:5; 5:5).  The Apostle Paul showed that Christ was “begotten” when He “was designated as the Son of God in power … by the resurrection from the dead” (Rom. 1:4).  The final reference to Jesus in this psalm is in verse 12: “Kiss the Son, lest He become angry … How blessed are all who take refuge in Him.”  Although this could refer to David as king, God was primarily pointing to His coming Son, the Messiah, our Lord. 

Son of God, Eternal Savior – YouTube

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January 18, Wednesday

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The Suffering Lamb of God — David certainly had times in his life as king when many of his own people caused suffering for him.  In this psalm, he lamented having to stay in those situations so long without being rescued by God.  Occasionally, we see ourselves in similar situations, going through difficult times and wanting to trust God, but feeling discouraged that He takes so long to help us.  Even more than that, we see in this psalm the sufferings of Jesus on the cross, Who quoted verse 1 in the midst of His pain: “MY GOD, MY GOD, WHY HAVE YOU FORSAKEN ME?”  (Matt. 27:46).  It was not that Jesus was unaware of what was happening to Him as the Lamb of God, but He quoted this psalm in an expression of the kind of emotional anguish we all feel during times of long-term suffering.  Matthew also referred to Ps. 22:7 when he wrote, “And those passing by were blaspheming Him, shaking their heads” (Matt. 27:39).  They were using ridicule or scorn to show contempt, and shaking one’s head was a physical way of expressing ridicule in that ancient culture.  Matthew also quoted from Ps. 22:8, as he described opponents of Jesus who mocked His faith in God: “HE TRUSTS IN GOD; LET GOD RESCUE HIM NOW IF HE DELIGHTS IN HIM” (Matt. 27:43).  Jesus not only suffered the physical and emotional abuse of people, but He also had to experience for the first time the turning away of the Father from His innocent sacrificial Lamb Who had taken upon Himself the sins of the world.

Hail, Thou Once Despised Jesus – YouTube

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January 19, Thursday

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Dividing Garments — These verses come from the same psalm we looked at yesterday.  Jesus clearly tied this psalm to His crucifixion by quoting its first verse as He was hanging by the nails in His hands: “MY GOD, MY GOD, WHY HAVE YOU FORSAKEN ME?” (Ps. 22:1; cf. Matt. 27:46).  Matthew (27:35) also referenced this psalm (Ps. 22:18) in describing the soldiers’ division of His garments by casting lots.  Although David wrote this psalm as he experienced his own suffering, he was unknowingly predicting what would happen to his later descendant, the Messiah.

Meditation: There is some question about another statement in this paragraph that relates to Jesus’ crucifixion.  Almost all English Bible translations have, “they pierced my hands and my feet” (v. 16b).  The LSB footnote, however, indicates that some ancient manuscripts read, “like a lion” (Hebrew: kâ’ărî) instead of “they pierced” (Hebrew: kâ’ărû), but the secondary reading seems to make much less sense.  The difference is only the stem length of two very similar Hebrew letters, ו (yaw) and י (yod). Certainly, Jesus was pierced by nails in His hands and feet and by a sword in His side.  The Apostle John witnessed it, and when most of Jesus’ disciples told Thomas about seeing the resurrected Christ, he said, “Unless I see in his hands the mark of the nails, and place my finger into the mark of the nails, and place my hand into his side, I will never believe” (John 20:25).  The wounds were the proof.

Worthy is the Lamb – YouTube

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January 20, Friday

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Not Corrupted, but Resurrected — The second part of verse 10 is quoted twice in the New Testament, once by Peter in his first sermon at Pentecost (Acts 2:27), and also by Paul (Acts 13:35) in the synagogue of Antioch (in Pisidia).  The key prophecy by David was this: “You will not give Your Holy One over to see corruption” (Ps. 16:10).  What would the worshiping people in David’s time have wondered about this “Holy One”?  They would likely be somewhat puzzled because they knew that the bodies of everyone who died would decay.  Paul cleared it up over 1,000 years later, however, when he revealed that the “Holy One” mentioned by David was Jesus.  Paul said that David, like all those ancient people, “fell asleep … and saw corruption; but He whom God raised did not see corruption” (Acts 13:36).  Resurrection triumphed over corruption.  Some day in the future, David, Peter, Paul, and all of us who know Christ and die physically, will be raised with a restored, incorruptible body to be with Jesus forever.

Because He Lives – YouTube

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January 21, Saturday

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Protect and Deliver — The “angel of Yahweh” (v. 7a) is seen again in this psalm of praise by David.  Here, He is described as Protector and Deliverer.  He “encamps around those who fear him” (v. 7b).  He is our unseen Protector.  This reminded me of the story of the king of Syria who surrounded the city of Dothan to seize Elisha (2 Kings 6).  Elisha’s servant was terrified when he saw them, but Elisha was calm and confident.  Why?  He knew that God’s army of angels surrounded not only the prophet and his servant, but also the whole city and the Syrian army around it.  Elisha asked God to open his servant’s eyes, “and, behold, the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha” (v. 17).  God then temporarily blinded the eyes of the enemy and rescued Elisha.  Do you see “the angel of Yahweh” protecting you and delivering you?  God surrounds us with His presence, love, and power even when we cannot see it.  Be calm and confident!

A Sovereign Protector I Have – YouTube

Published by abibleread

This website honors the Bible as the inspired Word of God through which God speaks to us as we read and study it.

One thought on “KJ Jan. 15-21

  1. Ben,
    It’s so wonderful to hear your voice! Thank you for recording these! I continue to read along but feel like I am with you, sitting under your live teaching. I love it!

    Liked by 1 person

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