KG Aug. 28 – Sep. 3

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August 28, Sunday

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Accepting the Rejected — This chapter begins the last major section of Isaiah’s prophecy.  The first verse summarizes the message of the previous 55 chapters (“Keep justice and do righteousness…”), and opens the door to the final 11 chapters (“…for soon my salvation will come”).  Who is going to be included in this collection of saved people?  Most Jews of Isaiah’s time thought it would only include Jews; most people would not qualify.  Today’s attitudes are not much different, thinking that only “good” people will be in heaven.  But God’s striking evaluation here is that He will accept many that mankind would reject.  People look at the outside, but God looks at the heart.  He gladly accepts the obedient eunuch and foreigner (vv. 4, 6).  This is why Jesus was so upset at the attitudes of the Jews who were desecrating the Court of Gentiles in the temple, quoting verse 7: “My house shall be called a house of prayer for all the nations” (Mark 11:17).  They were rejecting people whom God had accepted.  We need to evaluate our own attitudes about people in our church who are different than we are.  James warned about slighting “a poor man in shabby clothing” (James 2:2).  Reach out to them with Jesus’ love!  Don’t be repelled by people to whom God is attracted!  The Pharisees were disturbed about the former tax collectors and prostitutes who followed Jesus.  If we honestly looked at ourselves, we would realize that none of us is worthy of being accepted by God’s grace.

I’m Accepted, I’m Forgiven – YouTube

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August 29, Monday————————-ACCOUNTABILITY TIME!

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High Reaches Low — Verse 15 contains a great expression of two important attributes of God: His transcendence and His immanence.  Transcendence is a term used to show how much God is different from and above His creation.  He is “the One who is high and lifted up, who inhabits eternity…”  That is so unlike us—we are limited to time and space, but He is not, and in that sense, He is infinite.  In spite of the fact that He is so separated from us, He is not isolated from us, because He dwells “with him who is of a contrite and lowly spirit…”  That shows His immanence—God with us (Emmanuel).  He is intimately involved with His creation.  This verse also stresses God’s compassion: His purpose for being connected to us is “to revive the spirit of the lowly, and to revive the heart of the contrite.”  This transcendent God is also a God of immanence and compassion—the Great reaching out to the small.

Love Divine, All Loves Excelling – YouTube

ACCOUNTABILITY TIME!  If you are up to date in your reading as of August 29,
please click here or let me know today at accbibleread@gmail.com.

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August 30, Tuesday———————ACCOUNTABILITY REMINDER!

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Responsive God — God confronts superficial worship in this chapter.  The worshipers described here are pretty selfish, asking, “Why have we fasted, and you see it not?” (v. 3).  They were into worship for what they could get out of it.  Are we like that?  If so, we are trying to manipulate God, and He will not respond positively to that approach.  We are to worship Him for who He is.  There are several if-then combinations in this passage that define what God expects from us and what He promises to do.  Two of them have to do with our social responsibilities: “if” we release those who are oppressed (v. 6) and provide for those in need (v. 7), “then” God will bless us (v. 8) and be available to us (v. 9).  A similar response to this social righteousness is presented in verse 10.  The last if-then combination has to do with attitudes involved in worship: how do they keep the Sabbath?  God’s complaint was that they had a selfish attitude, “…doing your pleasure on my holy day” (v. 13).  They weren’t really willing to give one day of the week to the Lord to truly honor Him.  Do you sometimes wonder why God isn’t responding to you in the way you think He should?  If so, then evaluate how much you are involved in meeting the needs of others; consider how genuine and faithful you are in setting aside times for God.  If … then.

Blest Are the Pure in Heart – YouTube

ACCOUNTABILITY REMINDER!  If you are up to date in your reading as of August 30, and did not report yesterday, please click here or let me know today at accbibleread@gmail.com.

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August 31, Wednesday——————FINAL ACCOUNTABILITY DAY!

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Providing Salvation — There is an interesting progression of pronouns throughout this chapter.  It begins with a series of you-your pronouns (vv. 1-3), as God accuses His people of their sins.  He then broadens the accusations and distances Himself from all sinning people, using multiple they-their pronouns (vv. 4-8).  Then, Isaiah speaks, identifying himself with his people’s sins, using many we-our pronouns in verses 9-12.  After that, Isaiah speaks of Yahweh with he-his pronouns (vv. 15b-19).  The chapter closes with a series of my-pronouns (v. 21), as God speaks of His promised Messiah, “a Redeemer” (v. 20).  In the midst of this chapter’s transitioning progression from separation to salvation comes an important teaching about God, which is that He, Himself, must provide the solution for man’s sin problem: “The LORD saw it, and it displeased him … then his own arm brought him salvation…” (v. 15b).  This confirms that man cannot save himself, which is a very difficult lesson to accept.  All religions, except Christianity, concentrate on trying to be or act good enough to satisfy God.  That cannot be successful.  Man’s sin displeases God, and only He can provide the solution—the means of salvation.  He did that by sending Jesus as “a Redeemer” for mankind.  God provided the solution; now all that man has to do is to believe it and submit to His way.

I Will Sing of My Redeemer – YouTube

FINAL ACCOUNTABILITY DAY! — If you did not report in the last two days,
please let me know today where you are in your reading for this month,
whether you are caught up or not (accbibleread@gmail.com).  Thanks.

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September 1, Thursday

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In Its Time — This passage seems to mix the near future and the eternal future.  It would be partially fulfilled when God’s people would return from Babylon, but its ultimate fulfillment would not come until “the new Jerusalem” (Rev. 21:2), when “the LORD will be your everlasting light” (Isa. 60:19, 20).  Revelation 21:23 says that “the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God gives it light, and its lamp is the Lamb.”  God was not only the architect of our present universe, but is also the Creator of our future sphere of living.  It will be glorious beyond imagination, not just the best of what we know, but something we have not even thought of.  I like the way this chapter ends: “I am the LORD; in its time I will hasten it” (Isa. 60:22).  Like Christ’s Second Coming, when the time is just right, it will happen suddenly.  Just wait for it!

They That Wait Upon the Lord – YouTube

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September 2, Friday

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Good News Coming — Near the beginning of Jesus’ ministry, He read the first verse of this messianic prophecy from Isaiah as He stood in the synagogue of Nazareth, before people who knew Him.  They knew that Isaiah spoke here of the promised Messiah, and Jesus claimed to be that Servant by adding, “Today this Scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing” (Luke 4:21).  It caused quite a stir!  Jesus introduced the first phase of that promise by bringing the Good News, fulfilling the first part of Isaiah 61:2: “…to proclaim the year of the LORD’s favor.”  The final phase of the promise is still in our future, awaiting the Second Coming of Jesus at “the day of vengeance of our God” (v. 2b).  At that time, the wicked will be punished, but those who have followed Christ will be “clothed … with … salvation … [and] covered … with … righteousness” (v. 10).  The Good News has come, and there is more to come.

Ain’t-a That Good News! – YouTube

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September 3, Saturday

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God’s Feelings — This passage is packed with information about God and His work, but there are also several personal indications about God’s emotions that stood out to me.  His “steadfast love” (v. 7, Heb.: chesed) is one of them.  Yes, it is primarily about His covenant commitment to His people, but it also speaks to us of His tender concern toward them, and toward us.  The same verse says that God granted goodness to them “according to his compassion”—another expression of feelings.  The dictionary defines compassion as “sympathetic pity and concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others.”  God’s pity is also mentioned in verse 9, where “in his pity he redeemed them.”  Earlier in the same verse, it says that in “their affliction, he was afflicted.”  He felt their pain, even when it was applied by Him in discipline for their rebellion.  I believe that these “feelings” of God are real, and they show us something about His personal nature.  Probably the most striking emotion of God here is that when His people rebelled, it “grieved his Holy Spirit” (v. 10), showing the feelings of the third Person of the Trinity.  In the midst of a list of sins, Paul later pleaded with us, “do not grieve the Holy Spirit of God, by whom you were sealed for the day of redemption” (Eph. 4:30).  The same God still loves us, feeling compassion, pity, and pain when we struggle with sin and its effects.  Let us strive to keep from grieving Him!

In Tenderness He Sought Me – YouTube

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This website honors the Bible as the inspired Word of God through which God speaks to us as we read and study it.

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