KG April 24-30

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April 24, Sunday

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Ascribing Credit — The meaning of the word “ascribe,” as it is used in vv. 1-2, is “to give credit to/for.”  Here, we are commanded to “ascribe to the LORD … glory and strength.”  These two verses are also found in 1 Chron. 16:28-29, at the installation of the ark of the covenant in Jerusalem, and again in Ps. 96:7-8.  God’s glory is also emphasized by adding that it is “the glory due his name,” i.e., He really deserves the glory.  That glory is pictured at the end of Ps. 29:10: “…the LORD sits enthroned as king forever.”  Earlier, just after Moses installed Joshua as the new leader of Israel, he used this Hebrew word for “ascribe” in Deut. 32:3 to challenge the people to “ascribe greatness to our God.”  So, we are to give credit to God for His greatness, His glory, and His strength.  God’s glorious strength is the central idea in Ps. 29:3-9, where “The voice of the LORD” is used seven times to describe His control over a powerful storm in nature that sweeps through Israel from north to south, as He “thunders … is powerful … breaks … flashes … shakes … [and] strips…”  At the end of this display, the people in the temple cry out, “Glory!” (v. 9).  They saw God in the storm.  Whether we see a powerful storm, a calm sunny day, or a beautiful sunset, we should give credit to God for His greatness, glory, and strength.

Stand By Me – YouTube

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April 25, Monday

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Benefits of Love — This section of David’s psalm is framed with expressions of God’s steadfast love and righteousness (vv. 5-6, 10).  In between, David reflects on this thought: “How precious is your steadfast love, O God!”  That love is of utmost value and is described by the benefits it provides for His children.  One benefit it offers is refuge for us (v. 7b).  That refuge is not just an isolated “safe house”; it is personal and loving, “…in the shadow of your wings.”  Like a mother hen that offers a safe, warm place for her chicks, God opens His loving and protective arms to us.  While in His care, we “feast” on His abundance and “drink” from His “river” and “fountain” (vv. 8-9).  God is our inexhaustible source; He supplies us with everything we need.  When we read His Word every day, we also experience this benefit: “…in your light do we see light” (v. 9).  His steadfast love is infinite and “extends to the heavens” (v. 5).

The Love of God – YouTube

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April 26, Tuesday

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A Mere Breath — Twice in this psalm, David refers to human life as “a mere breath” (vv. 5, 11).  Compared with eternity, that is certainly true.  So, if God gives us such a short time to live on earth, what is the wisest way to live it?  The implied answer is to avoid God’s discipline, which results from our selfish choices to sin.  Verse 11 seems to be the key statement in this psalm: “When you discipline a man with rebukes for sin, you consume like a moth what is dear to him; surely all mankind is a mere breath!”  It not only shows the brevity of life, but it also shows that God’s discipline is His rebuke for our sins.  Even more strikingly, it shows the painfulness of that discipline.  God knows what will get your attention, what will hurt you the most, and He will “…consume … what is dear.”  What is dear to you?  Why risk it by sinning?  Since life is “a mere breath,” why not make the best of it?  As David wisely said, “O Lord, for what do I wait?  My hope is in you” (v. 7).  Let’s keep our hope in God and give Him our best!

Give of Your Best to the Master – YouTube

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April 27, Wednesday

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Bribing God — What is the proper motive for worship?  In this psalm, God seems to criticize Israel’s attitude when they brought sacrificial offerings to Him.  It was not that they were neglecting the acts of sacrifices because God said, “…your burnt offerings are continually before me” (v. 8).  The problem was that they seemed to have the idea that God needed those sacrifices to satisfy Himself.  Not true.  God said, “For every beast … is mine … all that moves in the field is mine” (vv. 10-11).  God doesn’t need anything because He already has everything.  The meat they burned on the altar was not food for God; He is never hungry (v. 12).  So, what were their motives in sacrificing to God?  Yes, they were doing it to be obedient, but it was almost as if they were trying to give God something they thought He needed in order for God to give them something they needed—blessings, success, etc.  That’s bribery!  It seems to me that verse 14 presents the proper motive for worship, i.e., thanksgiving, especially if the alternative translation provided in the ESV footnote is used: “Make thanksgiving your sacrifice to God.”  Don’t just go through the motions of worship; make it an offering of thanksgiving!  We should not worship God, thinking that He needs it or that He will be pleased and give us something in return.  No, God doesn’t need anything and cannot be bribed.  He wants us to recognize and acknowledge that everything we have was given to us by God.  In worship, attitude is everything.

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April 28, Thursday——————————–Accountability Time!

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Rejected or Restored — This psalm of David pictures God as the supreme Judge looking down from heaven (v. 2).  He sees people in two different ways.  In one way, they are all bad: “…there is none who does good, not even one” (v. 3).  Does this refer only to Gentiles?  I don’t think so, because Paul quoted this psalm to point out that “all, both Jews and Greeks, are under sin” (Rom. 3:9).  Because of that, all people deserve to be declared guilty and receive punishment.  But God makes a distinction between these guilty people.  For some, “God has rejected them” (Ps. 53:5); they receive the punishment.  For others, “God restores” them (v. 6); they receive salvation.  What is the difference?  The key is that those who are restored are “his people” (v. 6).  God has chosen them and saved them.  They didn’t deserve to be saved, but they were.  That is grace.  In the OT, God chose Israel’s descendants to be “his people.”  In the NT, the reason God sent His Son, Jesus (“Jehovah saves”), to the world was because “he will save his people from their sins” (Matt. 1:21).  Here again, those whom God saves are “his people.”  Jesus died to pay our penalty.  That is grace.  Paul said that “Anyone who does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to him” (Rom. 8:9; or “…is none of his”—KJV).  Are you a part of God’s family?  Does the Spirit of Christ dwell in you?  If so, you are not rejected, but are restored and will spend eternity in heaven, where we “will be his people and God himself will be with them as their God” (Rev. 21:3).

We Are God’s People – YouTube

ACCOUNTABILITY TIME — If you are up to date in your reading as of April 28, please click here or let me know now at accbibleread@gmail.com.

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April 29, Friday——————————-Accountability Reminder

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Whose Salvation? — Twice in this psalm, David mentioned “salvation” in his prayer.  The first time, he prayed for God to deliver Israel: “… give salvation by your right hand and answer us!” (v. 5).  Why should He?  Verses 6-8 give one reason: God’s promise (“God has spoken…”—v. 6).  The places listed in verses 6-7 are in the Promised Land of Israel.  David was reminding God of His promise.  God had also promised victory over the surrounding nations of Moab, Edom, and Philistia.  They would be God’s washbasin, a shoe rack, a conquered victim (v. 8).  David’s prayer could be ours as well: “Please, God; You promised!”  The second time David mentioned salvation in his prayer, he referred not to God’s salvation, but man’s salvation: “…for vain is the salvation of man!” (v. 11).  David was acknowledging the limitations of mankind.  This time, his prayer was, “Please, God; we can’t do it!”  It takes a spiritually sensitive person to recognize that.  Most of us have been strongly influenced by our you-can-do-it culture, so we tend to look first to ourselves for a way out of our difficulties.  David recognized his limitations, and so should we.  That doesn’t mean we should do nothing, however.  It is a cooperative effort; God supplies us with power to do what needs to be done: “With God we shall do valiantly; it is he who will tread down our foes” (v. 12).

Sing this hymn to the tune of “Stand Up, Stand Up for Jesus”

ACCOUNTABILITY REMINDER — If you are up to date in your reading as of April 29, but did not report yesterday, please click here or let me know now at accbibleread@gmail.com.

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April 30, Saturday——————————Accountability Deadline

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Sovereign Judgment — Most of us have negative thoughts about judgment because its focus seems to be on punishment, but God’s judgment is much broader than that.  This psalm points out three important things about God’s judgment.  First, it is timely: “At the set time that I appoint I will judge…” (v. 2).  A common theme throughout the Bible, also felt by us today, is that God is not prompt enough in judging evil.  Of course, we are thinking about the sins of others, not ours!  For us, we are thankful for His patience.  God is sovereign; He knows and chooses the right time to apply punishment for wrongdoing.  The second aspect of God’s judgment mentioned in this psalm is that His judgment is just: “…I will judge with equity” (v. 2b).  Equity is defined as the quality of being fair and impartial.  Everyone will get exactly what they deserve because God is a perfect record keeper.  There will be no favoritism, no bribes, and no political influence as we often see in human judges.  God is perfectly just.  Finally, God’s judgment is divine, in contrast to what is from human sources, coming “from the east … west … and … wilderness … it is God who executes judgment…” (vv. 6-7).  God’s people might have been hoping for help from human armies in their vicinity, but they should have looked to their ultimate helper, God Himself.  And, notice the broad concept of judgment in God’s sight: “…putting down one and lifting up another” (v. 7).  Divine judgment is positive as well as negative.

There’s a Wideness in God’s Mercy – YouTube

ACCOUNTABILITY DEADLINE — If you did not report in the last two days, please let me know today where you are in your reading for this month, whether you are caught up or not (accbibleread@gmail.com).  Thanks.

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Published by abibleread

This website honors the Bible as the inspired Word of God through which God speaks to us as we read and study it.

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